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Dance music is now the UK's second favourite genre

The BPI reveals that the genre makes up 25% of the top ten singles each week

  • Becky Buckle
  • 3 November 2022
Dance music is now the UK's second favourite genre

New data from the The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) has revealed that dance music is now the second most popular genre in the UK.

Dance/electronic music made up 25% of the weekly top ten singles in 2022, three times as much as 2019, with the chart presence of dance music has increased by almost 80% since 2021.

Scottish dance producing duo LF System reached number one in the UK charts this July with their track ‘Afraid to Feel’, becoming the second most-popular UK dance track of the year according to the Official Charts — with Lost Frequencies and Callum Scott's 'Where Are You Now' as the most popular.

Read this next: The 'B.O.T.A' effect: Why Eliza Rose's chart-topping club track has captured the nation

LF System told the BBC that dance music's popularity is "incredible".

"There's definitely a few things that are influencing this trend at the moment," one half of the duo Sean Finnigan said adding: "One of them being social media - big moments at raves are captured and go viral online and people want to be a part of it."

Eliza Rose and Interplanetary Criminal knocked LF System from the top spot with their viral house track 'B.O.T.A. (Baddest Of Them All)'.

Dance music has been prominent in the charts from big names including Drake and Beyoncé who delved into the genre in their 2022 releases.

Read this next: How 'Song 4 Mutya' became one of the UK's most enduring pop-dance anthems

In fact, Beyoncé is looking to score her first-ever GRAMMY award within the dance/electronic categories, for single ‘Break My Soul’.

However, this summer, Jaguar released a report through The Jaguar Foundation which displayed the extent of the gender disparity in dance music.

The report was released with the hopes that statistical and written evidence can act as a "springboard" for change within the indsutry, and so "non-binary people feel supported and represented.”

Becky Buckle is Mixmag's Video and Editorial Assistant, follow her on Twitter

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